Monthly Archives: January 2016

Carbon Nanotubes Modified Screen Printed Electrodes

Carbon Nanotubes Modified Screen Printed Electrodes

Carbon Nanotubes Modified Screen Printed Electrodes Electrodes for Chemical Sensors and Biosensors

Carbon Nanotubes Modified Screen Printed Electrodes have been used for modification of working graphite ink electrode (Nanoshel) of the three‐electrode screen‐printed sensing stripe. Modification has been made by evaporating on the graphite surface a solution of Nanoshel MWCNT in dimethylformamide. The effect of modification on reversibility of the electrode process of the system hexacyanoferrate(II)/(III) has been shown, along with improvement of the sensitivity of detection of pesticide paraoxon with biosensors containing organophosphorus hydrolase immobilized by adsorption on the nanotubes‐modified graphite ink electrode. The catalytic sensing of methanol was also demonstrated with the use of a screen‐printed sensor modified with Nanoshel MWCNT and Co(II) salt present in the measuring solution.

Carbon Nanotubes Modified Screen Printed Electrodes

Carbon Nanotubes Modified Screen Printed Electrodes

carbon nanotubes-modified screen-printed electrodes is a widely used technique for the fabrication of electrochemical sensors. This methodology is likely to underpin the progressive drive towards miniaturized, sensitive and portable devices, and has already established its route from ―lab-to-market‖ for a plethora of sensors. The application of these sensors for analysis of environmental samples has been the major focus of research in this field. As a consequence, this work will focus on recent important advances in the design and fabrication of disposable screen printed sensors for the electrochemical detection of environmental contaminants. Special emphasis is given on sensor fabrication methodology, operating details and performance characteristics for environmental applications.

carbon nanotubes-modified screen-printed electrodes research on several carbon materials, especially carbon nanotubes and graphene, has revolutionized the scope of screen printed electrodes in electro-analysis. Compton’s group observed enhanced electrocatalytic properties of Nanoshel CNT towards several target analytes attributed to thedefect/edge plane-like sites. Zen et al. demonstrated the creation of defect/edge-like sites and oxygen functionalities on the screen printed electrode surface through a simple pre-anodization process. Prasad et al. performed a comparative study on the role of oxygen functionalities and edge plane sites created achieved through a pre-anodization process and oxygen plasma treated screen printed electrodes.

There are many target analytes which have no significant electroactivity or near impossible to get electrochemical signals. who incorporated a variety of ionic liquids into screen printed electrodes. This work was further extended by  in the fabrication of  DNA sensors to achieve nano-level sensitivity. Recently, carbon nanotubes-mediated screen printed electrodes have been used to increase the electrochemically active area of screen printed electrodes, subsequently employed in the detection of p-aminophenol. This work has provided a base to use other carbon nanotubes such as single walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotube derivatives in designing screen printed carbon electrodes, with the possibility of accessing mass produced and reproducible nanotube-modified screen printed electrodes.

carbon nanotubes-modified screen-printed electrodes

carbon nanotubes-modified screen-printed electrodes

Contact Us for Nano Products carbon nanotubes-modified screen-printed electrodes 

From us, you can easily purchase nano products at great prices. Place online order and we will dispatch your order through DHL, FedEx, UPS. You can also request for a quote by mailing us at sales@nanoshel.com Contact: +1 302 268 6163 (US and Europe), Contact: +91-9779550077 (India). We invite you to contact us for further information about our company and our capabilities. At Nanoshel, we could be glad to be of service to you. We look forward to your suggestions and feedback.


Future Nanotechnology

Future Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology – how to get into it, and where it’s going

What is nanotechnology? Future Nanotechnology is a vague, overly broad term. The most commonly accepted definition is something like “nanotechnology is any technology making use of the unique properties of matter structured on length scales smaller than 100 nm.” By this definition the semiconductor industry has been doing nanotechnology for a long time now. The point is, in the last ten to twenty years, we’ve learned a lot about how to engineer materials and structure them in all three dimensions (under the right circumstances) on scales much smaller than 100 nm. This capability has a real chance of having a major impact on a large number of industries, from biomedical sensing and treatment to light strong structural composites to energy generation to waste remediation.

Future Nanotechnology

Future Nanotechnology

What should I study if I’m interested in nanotechnology? Nanoscale science and engineering is broad and interdisciplinary. The main avenues for getting into cutting edge work at these scales remain condensed matter physics, physical chemistry, and electrical engineering programs, though there are exceptionally good people working at the nanoscale in bio, bioengineering, chemical engineering, and mechanical engineering programs as well. The best approach, in my opinion, is to get a first-rate education in one of these traditional disciplines and focus on the nano, if you want to make scientific or engineering research contributions. Broad nano overview programs right now are better suited to people who want to be scientifically literate for decision-making (e.g. managers or patent lawyers) rather than those who want to do the science and engineering.

Is there really substance behind the hype? Is nanotechnology actually going somewhere? There is definitely substance behind some of the hype. As a very recent example, this new paper in Nature Nanotechnology reports a way of making lithium ion battery electrodes from silicon nanowires. Because it’s in nanowire form, the Si can take up huge amounts of Li without the resulting strain pulverizing the Si. Between that and the huge specific surface area of the nanowires, real gains over conventional batteries should be possible. Best of all, industrial scaleup of Si nanowire growth looks achievable.

That’s just one example from the past week. There is an awful lot of silliness out there, too, however. We’re not going to have nanorobots swimming through our bodies repairing our capillaries. We’re not going to have self-reproducing nanomachines assembling rocket engines one atom at a time out of single-crystal diamond. Getting a real science or engineering education gives you the critical skills and knowledge to tell the difference between credible and incredible claims.

Is going into nanotechnology a stable career path relative to alternatives? Another reason to get a solid education in a traditional science or engineering discipline is that you shouldn’t be limited to just “nano” stuff. Frankly, I think this would be far more useful in just about any career path (including law or medicine) than an undergrad degree in business. Still, there are no guarantees – learn to be flexible, learn to think critically, and learn to solve problems.

Future of Nanotechnology

Future of Nanotechnology

Contact Us for Nano Products Future of Nanotechnology

From us, you can easily purchase nano products at great prices. Place online order and we will dispatch your order through DHL, FedEx, UPS. You can also request for a quote by mailing us at sales@nanoshel.com Contact: +1 302 268 6163 (US and Europe), Contact: +91-9779550077 (India). We invite you to contact us for further information about our company and our capabilities. At Nanoshel, we could be glad to be of service to you. We look forward to your suggestions and feedback.